Ultimate Coffee Cheesecake Recipe

Cheesecake Coffee Cake recipe

3 cups biscuit mix
1/4 cup granulated sugar
1/2 cup milk
1/4 cup butter or margarine, melted
8 ounces cream cheese, softened
2 eggs
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/4 cup strawberry preserves

Combine biscuit mix, 1/4 cup granulated sugar, milk and butter. Stir vigorously 30 seconds. Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface. Knead 4 or 5 times. Pat evenly into the bottom and up the sides of an ungreased 9-inch round cake pan; set aside.

Combine cream cheese, eggs, 1/2 cup granulated sugar and vanilla extract. Beat at medium speed of electric mixer until smooth. Pour over dough. Bake at 350 degrees F for 30 to 35 minutes. Remove from oven; let stand for 10 minutes. Spread preserves over top.

Serve warm.

One Cup Breakfast with Coffee or Tea

Unfortunately many of us are in a rush most mornings these days. What is a quick way to get both your breakfast and morning coffee into your body?

If you are already a fan of protein shakes and cold drinks, consider combining your morning coffee with your favorite flavor of protein shake like chocolate, vanilla, caramel or peanut butter with cold coffee and ice.

Combine your cup of coffee, a cup of ice and your protein shake in a Bullet or Ninja style blender and blend until smooth. You may want to experiment with the proportions.

Ideally the coffee would no longer be hot. Warm to cold is OK. Consider brewing your coffee the night before and refrigerating it.

For tea drinkers consider combing cooled green tea with berries, citrus or stone fruits.

Additionally, one could add other vitamins, herbs, supplement powders or even vegetables.

New Study Suggest Coffee May Be Medicine for the Liver

According to a new study drinking three to four cups of either decaffeinated or caffeinated coffee can reduce one’s risk of getting or dying from chronic liver diseases.

Coffee drinkers, according to the study, were 21% less likely to develop chronic liver disease, had a 20% less chance of chronic or fatty liver disease and 49% less likely to die from chronic liver disease than non-coffee drinkers.

The study comes from the journal called BMC Public Health.

Author’s stated that coffee is widely accessible and could even be an avenue toward preventative treatment for chronic liver disease.

This would be very valuable for people with poor or no health insurance and those who live in countries or areas with less access to medical care.

 

 

 

New Study Claims Coffee Won’t Make Your Heart “Flutter”

If you’ve been worried that coffee will cause heart palpitations or cardiac arrhythmia a new study will have you relieved that your daily coffee drinking should not in fact cause this heart ailment.

Actually, daily coffee use has been connected with a lower occurrence of developing an arrhythmia like atrial fibrillation (which is when the heart races or “flutters” in the chest), according to the study.

The study, from JAMA Internal Medicine, monitored coffee consumption by more than 386,000 people over three years and compared that with arrhythmia rates, which could include atrial fibrillation (flutters).

After adjusting for things like lifestyle habits, demographics and other diseases and conditions that might cause flutters, the study found that each additional daily cup of coffee lowered risks of arrhythmia by 3%.

New Study Finds COVID-19 Will Increase Coffee Prices for Consumers

According to new research the COVID-19 pandemic is probably going to cause what authors called a “severe production crisis” in coffee as multifaceted web of socio-economic factors make conditions worse for small coffee farmers.

The multi university study including Rutgers, Purdue, the University of Hawaii, CIRAD, Exeter and Santa Clara University, looked at the leaf rust outbreaks in the Americas in the past and the recent outbreaks elsewhere of the crop-killing disease.

The study also discovered links between a lack of investment in coffee farms under poor socio-economic conditions, the increased prevalence of leaf rust and poor conditions for farmers and other players in the coffee production chain.

The study concluded that further socio-economic problems caused by COVID-19, like impacts on labor and reductions investments, are probably going not create long-term shocks that will threaten global production levels. The final link in this chain will be increased cost for everyday coffee consumers.