New “coffea arabica” Genetic Group Discovered

A new coffea arabica genetic strain has been discovered and will finally be on the market soon. Yemenia or the “Yemeni mother” represents many years of work by Oima Coffee. Oima is a Yemeni coffee exporter. They worked together with coffee geneticist Christophe Montagnon.

Yemenia may be an answer to the very real lack of diversity among the genetics of arabica coffee. It also has the added benefit of tasting good. Oima called the cup quality “exceptional.”

Alliance for Coffee Excellence will hold a private collection auction that focuses on Yemeni coffee. This will be the first place Yemenia will be available on the market.

Montagnon and Oima were on the chase for several years and genetically fingerprinted 137 different coffee samples. They traveled some 25k kilometers to do it.

Many believe this to be a very significant finding and are comparing it the centuries old discovery of Typica/Bourbon and SL arabica strains. These are the groups that gave way to the world’s other arabica coffees.

 

Coffee as Therapy for MS Fatigue?

According to a study published in Nutrients, coffee can help reduce Multiple Sclerosis related fatigue for those who have milder cases.

MS related fatigue is a huge problem affecting about 70% of MS patients and the fatigue they report is more than just being tired. It as been described by many as “extreme exhaustion” which can occur suddenly for no reason or be triggered by things like stress, infections, digestion or simple activity. Most experts agree that there is no clear therapeutic recommendation to treat this fatigue.

However, researchers at the University of Regensburg Hospital in Germany saw that coffee helped patients with mild MS symptoms concentrate better and helped them achieve a more structure daily routine.

The study’s authors noted that in the absence of any severe side effects and any other effective fatigue therapy that coffee consumption might be an approach for some patients with MS-related fatigue.

The self-reported study was limited to just 124 subjects and is not conclusive. However, it is a step forward.

As always it is recommended that both those that are healthy and those who have acute or long-term illnesses consult with a doctor before making changes to their diet or trying new therapies.

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