Dunkin’ Donuts Partners With Homesick to Make Special Holiday Candles

File this one under things weird things you never knew you needed. If you’ve got any Dunkin’ Donuts devotees on your shopping list, pay attention. By popular demand Homesick lifestyle brand and Dunkin’ have collaborate to release a limited release candle that smells like some of Dunkin’s classic coffee blends and treats.

“Flavors” include the ubiquitous Dunkin’ Original Blend and favorites like Old Fashioned Donut. The candles have notes of chocolate and caramel or nutmeg, cinnamon and clove, respectively.

The candles can be had for $34 as they are or for another $15 can come with personalized message printed on the jar.

Outside of fragrance based industries some may not be aware of the power of smell. It is more closely linked to memory than any of the other five senses. Dunkin and Homesick hope to reproducing happy memories for their candle customers. Especially considering how many will have very different holiday plans this year.

 

Coffee Leaf Rust Discovered in Hawaii

A disease known has coffee leaf rust or CLR has been discovered on the Big Island, Hawaii and the state’s largest coffee production island. The disease is known to bring coffee production to a halt.

This has been confirmed by the US Department of Agriculture National Identification Services. It is a fungal disease, known officially as Hemileia Vastarix. Samples were collected by a coffee grower near Holualoa, South of Kailua-Kona.

This discovery comes just two weeks after coffee leaf rust was discovered for the very first time in Hawaii. The first discovery was made on a coffee farm on Muai. State agricultural officials have not yet discovered CLR on any of the other Hawaiian islands.

While panic is undue the discovery of leaf rust on multiple Hawaiian Islands, especially in the Kona growing region which produces the states largest amount of coffee does present a clear threat to Hawaiian coffee production as the disease is known to spread quickly and to wreak havoc on coffee crops.