NPO World Coffee Research Changes Focus

NPO World Coffee Research is making dramatic change in its focus of operations. It will increase investments in breeding, nursery and seed development and begin to move away from coffee variety trials.

The NPO has shut down its Global Coffee Monitoring Program, which had been a complex global network of on-farm variety trials.

World Coffee Research stated that their goal was to pinpoint their focus on their primary strength—improving and modernizing the industry for the benefit of farmers and the industry.

World Coffee Research also stated that their variety monitoring program would continue in the Democratic Republic of Congo, the Philippines, Peru and Nicaragua. National research institutes and local organizations that WCR has worked with have plans to continue their work in other countries.

The Global Coffee Monitoring Program began in 2016 with 10 year, $18 million plan. After a 2020 consultation that included hundreds of interviews and almost a thousand surveys stakeholders decided on a new directions for the NPO between 2021-2025.

 

New Study Suggest Coffee May Be Medicine for the Liver

According to a new study drinking three to four cups of either decaffeinated or caffeinated coffee can reduce one’s risk of getting or dying from chronic liver diseases.

Coffee drinkers, according to the study, were 21% less likely to develop chronic liver disease, had a 20% less chance of chronic or fatty liver disease and 49% less likely to die from chronic liver disease than non-coffee drinkers.

The study comes from the journal called BMC Public Health.

Author’s stated that coffee is widely accessible and could even be an avenue toward preventative treatment for chronic liver disease.

This would be very valuable for people with poor or no health insurance and those who live in countries or areas with less access to medical care.

 

 

 

New Study Claims Coffee Won’t Make Your Heart “Flutter”

If you’ve been worried that coffee will cause heart palpitations or cardiac arrhythmia a new study will have you relieved that your daily coffee drinking should not in fact cause this heart ailment.

Actually, daily coffee use has been connected with a lower occurrence of developing an arrhythmia like atrial fibrillation (which is when the heart races or “flutters” in the chest), according to the study.

The study, from JAMA Internal Medicine, monitored coffee consumption by more than 386,000 people over three years and compared that with arrhythmia rates, which could include atrial fibrillation (flutters).

After adjusting for things like lifestyle habits, demographics and other diseases and conditions that might cause flutters, the study found that each additional daily cup of coffee lowered risks of arrhythmia by 3%.

New Study Finds COVID-19 Will Increase Coffee Prices for Consumers

According to new research the COVID-19 pandemic is probably going to cause what authors called a “severe production crisis” in coffee as multifaceted web of socio-economic factors make conditions worse for small coffee farmers.

The multi university study including Rutgers, Purdue, the University of Hawaii, CIRAD, Exeter and Santa Clara University, looked at the leaf rust outbreaks in the Americas in the past and the recent outbreaks elsewhere of the crop-killing disease.

The study also discovered links between a lack of investment in coffee farms under poor socio-economic conditions, the increased prevalence of leaf rust and poor conditions for farmers and other players in the coffee production chain.

The study concluded that further socio-economic problems caused by COVID-19, like impacts on labor and reductions investments, are probably going not create long-term shocks that will threaten global production levels. The final link in this chain will be increased cost for everyday coffee consumers.

 

Xbar Espresso Maker on KickStarter

The newest coffee related Kickstarter project is a portable espresso brewer called the Xbar. It employs either CO2 cartridges or a bike tire pump to create water pressure.

A pair of valves on the side of the Xbar allow for the two different pressures sources. One is a Shrader valve compatible with many kinds of bike pumps. The other valve, of course, takes one use 8-gram CO2 cartridges. Much like those in small seltzer makers.

If using a bike pump, the pump controls the upward ramp of pressure during brewing. If using a cartridge, a paddle on the top of the Xbar lets brewers control the upward ramp of pressure. In both cases a metal knob on the side is used to throttle the pressure down. A standard pressure gauge on the face of the espresso maker lets brewers monitor the pressure level.

The brew head is stainless steel. The pressure control system is aluminum, stainless steal and brass. The aluminum stand comes in two heights depending on what kind of cups brewers prefer.

Xbar says a user should get 4-8 double or triple shots of espresso from one CO2 cartridge—all dependent on water volume, extraction duration etc.