Less Sweet Chocolate Biscotti

Traditionally, biscotti were dunked in wine – but their pleasing crisp texture is also delightful with a cup of coffee or glass of milk.

Less Sweet Chocolate Biscotti

Ingredients

1/3 cup butter, softened
2/3 cup packed brown sugar
2 teaspoons baking powder
2 eggs
1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
1-2/3 cups all-purpose flour
1 cup toasted hazelnuts (filberts), chopped
4 ounces bittersweet chocolate, chopped
6 ounces special dark chocolate or bittersweet chocolate, chopped
2 teaspoons shortening

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 375F. Lightly grease a cookie sheet; set aside. Beat butter in a large mixing bowl with an electric mixer on medium to high speed for 30 seconds. Add brown sugar, baking powder, and salt. Beat until combined, scraping side of bowl occasionally. Beat in eggs and cocoa powder. Beat in as much flour as you can with the mixer. Stir in any remaining flour, the hazelnuts, and 4 ounces bittersweet chocolate with a wooden spoon.

2. Divide dough in half. shape each portion into a 9-inch-long roll. Place rolls 4 inches apart on prepared cookie sheet, slightly flatten each roll to 2 inches wide.

3. Bake in preheated oven for 20 to 25 minutes or until a wooden pick inserted near centers comes out clean. Cool on cookie sheet for 45 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 325F.

4. Cut each roll diagonally into 1/2-inch-thick slices, slicing carefully with a serrated knife. Place slices, cut sides down, on cookie sheet.

5. Bake in 325F oven for 8 minutes. Carefully turn slices over and bake for 7 to 9 minutes more or until dry and crisp. Transfer to wire racks and let cool, about 1 hour. Makes 2 dozen.

6. Microwave chopped chocolate and shortening in a small microwave-safe bowl on 50 percent power (medium) for 1 to 2 minutes or until melted., stirring twice. Dip one end of each cookie into melted chocolate; let excess drip back into bowl. Place cookies on waxed paper; let stand until set.

Note: To toast nuts, spread them in a single layer in a shallow baking pan. Bake in a preheated 375F oven for 4 to 5 minutes or until nuts are slightly golden brown, stirring once or twice. Wrap warm nuts in a clean kitchen towel. Rub nuts in towel to remove any loose skins; cool completely. Chop nuts and set aside.

 

NPO World Coffee Research Changes Focus

NPO World Coffee Research is making dramatic change in its focus of operations. It will increase investments in breeding, nursery and seed development and begin to move away from coffee variety trials.

The NPO has shut down its Global Coffee Monitoring Program, which had been a complex global network of on-farm variety trials.

World Coffee Research stated that their goal was to pinpoint their focus on their primary strength—improving and modernizing the industry for the benefit of farmers and the industry.

World Coffee Research also stated that their variety monitoring program would continue in the Democratic Republic of Congo, the Philippines, Peru and Nicaragua. National research institutes and local organizations that WCR has worked with have plans to continue their work in other countries.

The Global Coffee Monitoring Program began in 2016 with 10 year, $18 million plan. After a 2020 consultation that included hundreds of interviews and almost a thousand surveys stakeholders decided on a new directions for the NPO between 2021-2025.

 

New Study Suggest Coffee May Be Medicine for the Liver

According to a new study drinking three to four cups of either decaffeinated or caffeinated coffee can reduce one’s risk of getting or dying from chronic liver diseases.

Coffee drinkers, according to the study, were 21% less likely to develop chronic liver disease, had a 20% less chance of chronic or fatty liver disease and 49% less likely to die from chronic liver disease than non-coffee drinkers.

The study comes from the journal called BMC Public Health.

Author’s stated that coffee is widely accessible and could even be an avenue toward preventative treatment for chronic liver disease.

This would be very valuable for people with poor or no health insurance and those who live in countries or areas with less access to medical care.

 

 

 

New Study Claims Coffee Won’t Make Your Heart “Flutter”

If you’ve been worried that coffee will cause heart palpitations or cardiac arrhythmia a new study will have you relieved that your daily coffee drinking should not in fact cause this heart ailment.

Actually, daily coffee use has been connected with a lower occurrence of developing an arrhythmia like atrial fibrillation (which is when the heart races or “flutters” in the chest), according to the study.

The study, from JAMA Internal Medicine, monitored coffee consumption by more than 386,000 people over three years and compared that with arrhythmia rates, which could include atrial fibrillation (flutters).

After adjusting for things like lifestyle habits, demographics and other diseases and conditions that might cause flutters, the study found that each additional daily cup of coffee lowered risks of arrhythmia by 3%.

New Study Finds COVID-19 Will Increase Coffee Prices for Consumers

According to new research the COVID-19 pandemic is probably going to cause what authors called a “severe production crisis” in coffee as multifaceted web of socio-economic factors make conditions worse for small coffee farmers.

The multi university study including Rutgers, Purdue, the University of Hawaii, CIRAD, Exeter and Santa Clara University, looked at the leaf rust outbreaks in the Americas in the past and the recent outbreaks elsewhere of the crop-killing disease.

The study also discovered links between a lack of investment in coffee farms under poor socio-economic conditions, the increased prevalence of leaf rust and poor conditions for farmers and other players in the coffee production chain.

The study concluded that further socio-economic problems caused by COVID-19, like impacts on labor and reductions investments, are probably going not create long-term shocks that will threaten global production levels. The final link in this chain will be increased cost for everyday coffee consumers.