Coffee Advice from former Googlers

Two former Googlers, Jake Knapp and John Zeratsky who worked on Gmail and YouTube, have some advice for handling your caffeine habit.

They suggest you not drink coffee first thing. Perhaps wait until after 9:30 am. Cortisol is highest before that so its not needed earlier.

They say that caffeine doesn’t give an energy boost but prevents energy from waning. “If you wait until you are tired, it’s too late.” Since energy level goes down after lunch, have your second coffee half hour in advance.

If you miss that second cup in time, they suggest you take a nap.

Instead of another big cup of coffee in the afternoon, switch to tea or espresso (small cup), which have less caffeine.

Use proper timing for your last cup. Caffeine half-life it 5-6 hours so if your last cup is 4pm, you will still have half the effect of the caffeine at bedtime.

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Starbucks leaving straws behind

If you love Starbucks iced coffee and cold drinks, you won’t be able to drink it using a straw by the year 2020. They announced they will be doing away with straws and going to recyclable strawless lid. They have already made the move in more than 8,000 stores in the U.S. and Canada and will move to the others (over 28,000 globally) by the year 2020. Additionally they will begin offering straws made of alternative recyclable materials such as paper or compostable plastic for their Frappuccino® beverages by request.

They hope to be the leaders of the trend to focus on sustainability for other companies to follow and stem the ocean plastic. Cold beverages now account for over 50% of Starbucks beverages so straw usage has been climbing.

Other trends they have followed for sustainability include ethically-sourced coffee at 99%; charging 5p per paper cup in the London to promote reusability; discounting customers who bring a reusable cup or tumber to company-owned stores to name a few.

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Coffee People: the Zine

There’s a new zine for coffee lovers. It is by, for, and about coffee people. These are artists. Coffee artists. Think baristas. Started by Kat Melheim, a Denver, Colorado barista, the zine focuses on everything coffee. Noticing that those involved in the coffee industry also have side art projects, she wanted to focus on the creativity of them. She wanted to connect coffee people to each other through their related fields.

She is currently taking submissions for the next zine. For more info see her website.

You can listen to her podcast on SoundCloud.

Vegan Coffee Drinks

For the many people that follow Vegan or Paleo diets, Starbucks now has coffee drinks for you. The Starbucks Doubleshot® Coffee Smoothie. It comes in Dark Chocolate and Vanilla Honey flavors. They are made with almond milk. They have been available since May.

Later this year, bottled Frappuccino® chilled coffee drink will be available as well. It is made with almond milk and will come in Vanilla and Mocha flavors.

They will also have single-serve Cold Brew coffee in Vanilla & Fig flavor and Sweetened Black.

Starbucks also has White Chocolate Mocha Latte available at grocery stores that carry Starbucks coffee products.

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Types of Coffee

Let’s talk types of coffee. From a variety standpoint, there are basically only two main categories: Robusta and Arabica.

Arabica has a more delicate flavor and lower acidity than Robusta. It is grown in higher altitudes and is more costly to grow and more difficult to grow, so they have a lower yield that makes it cost more. Robusta has higher amounts of caffeine but can grow in hot, low altitudes, and with less moisture. Most commercial beans are this variety.

Coffee beans are green so they must be roasted. They range in roast from light brown to very dark brown and are broken into three roast levels: Light, Medium, and Dark.

Light roast is considered most delicate but also has higher acidity. You get more of the original coffee bean flavor. Medium roast have a chocolate color, less acidity than the lighter roast, and a toasty flavor. The Dark roast beans are roasted until they caramelize and oils come out of the bean. They may look oily. They have a strong flavor. Blends will combine two or more of these roasting levels.

Source:
https://www.thespruceeats.com/