Storing your beans

First off, the Victor crew wants to point out it is better to buy whole beans rather than ground coffee. Why? Because you wanted the freshest cup you can get. Storing them in bean form helps protect the quality in and of itself. Once the bean is broken, the coffee oxidizes quickly. It is best to grind right before you brew.

For the best filter brewed coffee, it is better to get it as close to the roast date as possible. But note that coffee needs a day or two of rest after it is roasted before using it. This helps any gas trapped in them to escape. For espresso, you want to rest the beans for about five days. If you can, get your coffee within three to ten days from the roast date.

It also helps if you store the beans correctly. Paper bags will lose the flavor quicker. Try to use sealed one-way valve foil bags. If it comes in one, leave it in. If it is in a paper bag, transfer to an air-tight container kept out of sunlight.

Don’t freeze or refrigerate your coffee. When it thaws it won’t taste the same. Also it may pick up flavors from items in the freezer or refrigerator. In the refrigerator, it may pick up condensation and push oils to the surface and age the coffee faster. If you stock up and already have a few bags go ahead and store in freezer but thaw to room temperature. It won’t taste the same.

Source

Chocolate Covered Coffee Beans

Here is a recipe sure to please. You may even think about making these as a gift around the holidays. These are one of my favorite treats!

Ingredients
3/4 cup dipping chocolate dark, milk or white (the best you can afford)
1/2 cup coffee beans, roasted
cocoa powder if desired

Melt the chocolate in a double boiler or in a bowl in the microwave (see your microwave’s settings for melting chocolate.) When the chocolate is melted, pour in the coffee beans and stir to coat. Remove the beans one by one with a fork. If desired, roll in cocoa powder. Place on a baking sheet covered with waxed or parchment paper. Place in refrigerator to set. Enjoy.

Jody Victor

Buying the best coffee beans

In an article by Men’s Journal, we found some good advice about buying coffee beans. According to Todd Carmichael, who searches for the best coffee beans in Travel Channel’s Dangerous Grounds, these tips will help you choose the best beans for you.

Find your flavor profile. He says there are 3 categories: bitter chocolate (earthy or bold), nutty sweet (walnut or honey), and acidic fruit (lemon or lime).

Experiment. Sign up for a subscription program with some roasters or a craft coffee maker.

Buy Direct (never from grocer). He states that buying coffee from a grocer is like buying fish in a shoe store. Use your phone or buy on internet.

Brew better instantly. He claims the ratio should be 1 gram coffee for every 17 grams of water.

~ Jody Victor

Jody Victor® has an idea for gift giving

Jody thinks it’s a great idea to give a coffee or tea themed gift to the coffee or tea lovers in your life whether it is family, friend, or business associate.

You can start with a basket and fill it with all sorts of goodies. You can include:

  • Mugs
  • Chocolate covered coffee beans
  • Biscotti
  • Specialty Coffee or Tea
  • Herbal Tea
  • Exotic Coffee or Tea
  • Music CD

When you are done adding all the goodies, you can wrap in cellophane, add a note and a bow and it’s ready to give to your coffee or tea lover for their holiday!

Jody hopes this gift idea was helpful this season.

Jody Victor® wonders about the most expensive coffee in the world

Last time we looked at expensive tea. Now let’s find the most expensive coffee.
In searching for the world’s most expensive coffee, Jody Victor® found that there were 2 different coffees making that claim. Let’s look at both of them.

First, we have Kopi Luwak, or civet coffee. It is made from beans of coffee berries previously eaten by the Asian Palm Civet then passed through their digestive tracts. The civet eats the fleshy pulp of the berry and the civet’s enzymes seep into the beans in the digestive tract. They are then eliminated and keep their shape. They are washed, sun-dried, roasted and brewed. Prices reach $160-$240/pound.

Second is Black Ivory Coffee from Thailand. It is said to be served at only 4 resorts in the world. Three in the Maldives and one in Thailand. The price is about $1,100/kilo (or $499/pound) – about $50/cup. The elephants are raised in a natural reserve and 8% of proceeds go to the Triangle Asian Elephant Foundation. They are fed only Thai Arabica coffee beans gronw at about 5,000 feet altitude. They need more than 72 pounds of coffee cherries to make 2.2 lbs. of coffee beans.

Well, Jody, are you going to try these coffees?