Almost Spring Latte Recipe

It is quite spring but here in Ohio we are having some warmer whether and a flower is popping up here and there. It is also almost St. Patrick’s Day. Here is an unusual coffee treat to warm you up if you still need or add ice if things are feeling a little stuffy.

Lavender Mint Latte
2 ounces espresso
5 ounces cold whole milk
3/4 ounce lavender syrup
2/3 ounce peppermint syrup
mint leaf

Add premade espresso to your favorite glass. In whatever you’ll use to steam the milk add milk, lavender syrup and peppermint syrup. Pour milk over the coffee. Hold the froth until you’ve poured enough milk. Mint leaf for garnish.

Steamed Milk at Home:
Add desired amount of milk to a small pan.
Keep your stove on low-medium.
Stir milk gently until the temperature reaches 150°F.
Add the steamed milk to brewed coffee, or froth as desired with whisk.

All About Tea: International Tea Day pt. 1

While the first ever International Tea Day has passed us by (21 May), there is a whole lot to say about tea. While coffee, especially espresso beverages, are becoming more and more popular around the world lots of people still drink hot tea.

While many people were sheltering at home during the pandemic, they enjoyed a “quarantea” everyday at the same time with whomever they were sheltering with. Many found this ritual to be calming and reassuring during times in which we’ve all been stressed out and unsure of what was coming next.

Many are evening finding ways to keep the tradition of a daily tea as part of their routine as we all begin to transition out of sheltering at home.

People, for centuries, have drank tea to reinvigorate, to soothe, to relax and just because it tastes good. Even with the rising popularity of fancy espresso and coffee drinks tea remains a mainstay around the world. In the UK the ubiquity of tea remains with the British drinking about 100 million cups of the stuff every day, according to their Tea Advisory panel.

Experts have begun to study what affects tea might have on mood and cognition. One thing they are trying to find out is whether it is the compounds in tea itself that are relaxing or invigorating or the context in which tea is consumed that brings on these effects.

Green and black teas come from the same source, the plant camellia sinensis. Green tea is processed differently resulting in higher concentrations of compounds scientists believe have a positive effect on mental health.